Untitled

archatlas:

Pedro Cobo

A small sampling of the beautiful photographs you will find in the Momentos (Moments) tumblr, all original images from this photographer.

Check out this blog!

All images Pedro Cobo ©.

sagelands:

セージ ランズ 
skunkbear:

At 10:02 AM on August 27th, 1883, a volcanic island in modern day Indonesia called Krakatoa erupted. The blast sent shockwaves across the ocean, triggering tsunamis that destroyed the coast of Java and Sumatra. The sound was so loud it was heard 3000 miles away.
As Aatish Bhatia notes in this recent article: “What we’re talking about here is like being in Boston and clearly hearing a noise coming from Dublin, Ireland." 
Barometric readings at the time clocked the sound pressure at 172 decibels ONE HUNDRED MILES AWAY from the island.
Here’s a handy reference:
Using a jackhammer — 100 decibels
Human threshold for pain — 130 dB
Standing next to a jet engine — 150 dB
And the scale is logarithmic - so a 10 dB increase doubles the loudness.

skunkbear:

At 10:02 AM on August 27th, 1883, a volcanic island in modern day Indonesia called Krakatoa erupted. The blast sent shockwaves across the ocean, triggering tsunamis that destroyed the coast of Java and Sumatra. The sound was so loud it was heard 3000 miles away.

As Aatish Bhatia notes in this recent article:What we’re talking about here is like being in Boston and clearly hearing a noise coming from Dublin, Ireland."

Barometric readings at the time clocked the sound pressure at 172 decibels ONE HUNDRED MILES AWAY from the island.

Here’s a handy reference:

  • Using a jackhammer — 100 decibels
  • Human threshold for pain — 130 dB
  • Standing next to a jet engine — 150 dB

And the scale is logarithmic - so a 10 dB increase doubles the loudness.

breathtakingdestinations:

Saint Basil’s Cathedral  - Red Square - Moscow - Russia (von CharlesFred)

breathtakingdestinations:

Saint Basil’s Cathedral - Red Square - Moscow - Russia (von CharlesFred)

leslieseuffert:

Lyon-based photographer, Philippe Pétremant’s series, Les Sept Mercenaires (The Magnificent Seven), is a clever spin on portraiture. For the project, the artist collages together paper money from all around the world to form the faces of different political figures, including Che Guevara. He simply folds and arranges the paper, and then secures it all together with a paperclip. Pétremant’s project is a visual exploration of cultures as their currencies mesh together in unexpected forms. Each portrait is dependent on the placement of each bank note and they can only exist as a collective whole. There are two parts to experiencing this work. First, viewers can attempt to see the face as a whole, squinting to blend the parts together. Second, viewers can enjoy the process of identifying the various monetary notes and their countries of origin. The surprisingly curious choice of materials turns out to be both a still life as well as a new twist on the old, classic portrait painting.

Foreign Currencies Combined to Form New Unique Faces 

enochliew:

Sedus Development Centre by Sauerbruch Hutton
A warehouse for Sedus Stoll AG, a manufacturer of office furniture.

enochliew:

Sedus Development Centre by Sauerbruch Hutton

A warehouse for Sedus Stoll AG, a manufacturer of office furniture.

subtilitas:

CH + QS - Matadero de Legazpi cinema center, Madrid 2011 (prev, the screening room). Via, photos (C) Fernando Guerra.

atavus:

Bo Christian Larsson

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